Advanced Chemistry

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About this course: A chemistry course to cover selected topics covered in advanced high school chemistry courses, correlating to the standard topics as established by the American Chemical Society. Prerequisites: Students should have a background in basic chemistry including nomenclature, reactions, stoichiometry, molarity and thermochemistry.

Created by:  University of Kentucky
  • Taught by:  Dr. Allison Soult, Lecturer

    Chemistry
  • Taught by:  Dr. Kim Woodrum, Sr. Lecturer

    Chemistry
Language English How To Pass Pass all graded assignments to complete the course. User Ratings 4.6 stars Average User Rating 4.6See what learners said Cou…

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When you enroll for courses through Coursera you get to choose for a paid plan or for a free plan

  • Free plan: No certicification and/or audit only. You will have access to all course materials except graded items.
  • Paid plan: Commit to earning a Certificate—it's a trusted, shareable way to showcase your new skills.

About this course: A chemistry course to cover selected topics covered in advanced high school chemistry courses, correlating to the standard topics as established by the American Chemical Society. Prerequisites: Students should have a background in basic chemistry including nomenclature, reactions, stoichiometry, molarity and thermochemistry.

Created by:  University of Kentucky
  • Taught by:  Dr. Allison Soult, Lecturer

    Chemistry
  • Taught by:  Dr. Kim Woodrum, Sr. Lecturer

    Chemistry
Language English How To Pass Pass all graded assignments to complete the course. User Ratings 4.6 stars Average User Rating 4.6See what learners said Coursework

Each course is like an interactive textbook, featuring pre-recorded videos, quizzes and projects.

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University of Kentucky The University of Kentucky is the Commonwealth’s flagship, land-grant institution of higher learning. With more than 30,000 students and 16 academic colleges and a graduate school, it is one of only eight universities in America with the full range of professional, medical and liberal arts programs on one contiguous campus.

Syllabus


WEEK 1


Kinetics



The study of chemical kinetics is the study of change over time. It answers questions like: How fast are reactants consumed? How fast are products formed? This unit is dedicated to the exploration of how these questions are answered. We will look at the experimental evidence of how concentration affects these rates. We will also examine what occurs on the molecular level, especially with respect to the motion of molecules, that affects rates of reactions.


19 videos, 2 readings expand


  1. Reading: Syllabus
  2. Reading: Kinetics Lecture Notes and Practice Problems
  3. Video: 1.01 The Rate of Chemical Reactions
  4. Video: 1.02 Comparing Rate of Change for Reactants and Products
  5. Video: 1.02a Obtaining a Rate Law from Experimental Data Equations
  6. Video: 1.03 The Rate Law
  7. Video: 1.04 Obtaining a Rate Law from Experimental Data
  8. Video: 1.04a Rate Law Calculations
  9. Video: 1.05 First-Order Kinetics and the Integrated Rate Law
  10. Video: 1.05a Graphic 1st Order
  11. Video: 1.06 First-Order Kinetics and the Half-Life
  12. Video: 1.07 Second-Order Reactions
  13. Video: 1.07a Graphics 2nd Order
  14. Video: 1.08 Collision Theory
  15. Video: 1.08a Activation Energy
  16. Video: 1.09 The Arrhenius Equation
  17. Video: 1.09a Graphic Activation Energy
  18. Video: 1.10 Reaction Mechanisms
  19. Video: 1.10a RDS Fast Equilibrium
  20. Video: 1.10b Rate Determining Step
  21. Video: 1.11 Catalysis

Graded: Kinetics

WEEK 2


Chemical Equilibrium



This unit introduces the concept of chemical equilibrium and how it applies to many chemical reactions. The quantitative aspects of equilibrium are explored thoroughly through discussions of the law of mass action as well as the relationship between equilibrium constants with respect to concentrations and pressures of substances. Much of the discussion explores how to solve problems to find either the value of the equilibrium constant or the concentrations of substances at equilibrium. ICE (initial-change-equilibrium) tables are introduced as a problem-solving tool and multiple examples of their use are included. From a qualitative standpoint, Le Châtelier’s principle is used to explain how various factors affect the equilibrium constant of a reaction along with the concentrations of all species.


16 videos, 1 reading expand


  1. Reading: Chemical Equilibrium Lecture Notes and Practice Problems
  2. Video: 2.01 Dynamic Equilibrium
  3. Video: 2.02 Law of Mass Action
  4. Video: 2.03 Law of Mass Action for Combined Reactions
  5. Video: 2.04 Relationship Between Kc and Kp
  6. Video: 2.04a Relationship Between Kc and Kp
  7. Video: 2.05 Calculating the Equilibrium Constant
  8. Video: 2.05a Finding Kc
  9. Video: 2.06 Reaction Quotient
  10. Video: 2.06a Predicting Reaction Progress with the Reaction Quotient
  11. Video: 2.07 Calculating Equilibrium Concentrations
  12. Video: 2.07a Finding Equilibrium Concentrations, part 1
  13. Video: 2.07b Finding Equilibrium Concentrations, part 2
  14. Video: 2.07c Finding Equilibrium Concentrations, part 3
  15. Video: 2.08 Le Chatelier's Principle Part A
  16. Video: 2.08a Le Chatelier's Principle Part B
  17. Video: 2.08b How Changes Shift the Equilibrium

Graded: Chemical Equilibrium

WEEK 3


Acid-Base Equilibria



The concept of equilibrium is applied to acid and base solutions. To begin, the idea of weak acids and bases is explored along with the equilibrium constants associated with their ionization in water and how the value of the equilibrium constant is associated with the strength of the acid or base. The autoionization of water is discussed and how temperature affects this process. A variety of problem types are covered including calculations of pH, pOH, [OH-], and [H+] for both strong and weak acids and bases. Aqueous salt solutions are classified as acids and bases and the multi-step ionization of polyprotic acids is discussed. Finally, the concept of Lewis acids and bases is discussed and demonstrated through examples.


14 videos, 1 reading expand


  1. Reading: Acid-Base Equilibria Lecture Notes and Practice Problems
  2. Video: 3.01 Acids and Bases
  3. Video: 3.02 pH and Kw
  4. Video: 3.02a Finding Kw
  5. Video: 3.03 Acid Strength
  6. Video: 3.04 Finding pH
  7. Video: 3.05 Strong and Weak Bases
  8. Video: 3.05a Calculating equilibrium concentrations of a weak base, part 1
  9. Video: 3.05b Calculating equilibrium concentrations of a weak base, part 2
  10. Video: 3.06 Ions as Acids and Bases
  11. Video: 3.06a Acid-base properties of aqueous salts, part 1
  12. Video: 3.06b Acid-base properties of aqueous salts, part 2
  13. Video: 3.06c Acid-base properties of aqueous salts, part 3
  14. Video: 3.07 Types of Acids
  15. Video: 3.08 Polyprotic Acids

Graded: Acid-Base Equilibrium

WEEK 4


Aqueous Equilibria
This unit continues and expands on the theme of equlibria. You will examine buffers, acid/base titrations and the equilibria of insoluble salts.


31 videos, 1 reading expand


  1. Reading: Aqueous Equilibria Lecture Notes and Practice Problems
  2. Video: 4.01 Buffers and the Common Ion Effect
  3. Video: 4.02 pH of Buffer Solutions
  4. Video: 4.02a Aqueous Equilibria Worked Example 1
  5. Video: 4.03 Buffer Action
  6. Video: 4.03a Aqueous Equilibria Worked Example 2
  7. Video: 4.03b Aqueous Equilibria Worked Example 3
  8. Video: 4.04 Buffer: Preparation and Capacity
  9. Video: 4.05 Strong Acid - Strong Base Titration
  10. Video: 4.06 Titrations Involving Either a Weak Acid or a Weak Base
  11. Video: 4.06 Part 1 Aqueous Equilibria Worked Example
  12. Video: 4.06 Part 1.a - Aqueous Equilibria Worked Example
  13. Video: 4.06 Part 1.b - Aqueous Equilibria Worked Example
  14. Video: 4.06 Part 1.c - Aqueous Equilibria Worked Example
  15. Video: 4.06 Part 1.f Aqueous Equilibria Worked Example
  16. Video: 4.06 Part 1.h Aqueous Equilibria Worked Example
  17. Video: 4.12a Aqueous Equilibria Worked Example
  18. Video: 4.06 Part 2.b Aqueous Equilibria Worked Example
  19. Video: 4.07 Polyprotic Acid Titrations
  20. Video: 4.08 Indicators
  21. Video: 4.09 Solubility Equilibria
  22. Video: 4.10 Molar Solubility and the Solubility Product
  23. Video: 4.10a Aqueous Equilibria Worked Example
  24. Video: 4.11 Molar Solubility and the Common Ion Effect
  25. Video: 4.11.1 Aqueous Equilibria Worked Example
  26. Video: 4.11.a Aqueous Equilibria Worked Example
  27. Video: 4.06 Part 2.a Aqueous Equilibria Worked Example
  28. Video: 4.11 2.c Aqueous Equilibria Worked Example
  29. Video: 4.12 The Effect of pH on Solubility
  30. Video: 4.11 2.b - Aqueous Equilibria Worked Example
  31. Video: 4.13 Precipitation Reaction and Selective Precipitation
  32. Video: 4.13a Aqueous Equilibria Worked Example

Graded: Aqueous Equilibria

WEEK 5


Thermodynamics
The overarching theme of thermodynamics is the prediction of whether a reaction will occur spontaneously under a certain set of conditions. Entropy and Free Energy are defined and utilized for this purpose.


20 videos, 1 reading expand


  1. Reading: Thermodynamics Lecture Notes and Practice Problems
  2. Video: 5.01 Review of Thermochemistry
  3. Video: 5.01a Enthalpy of Reaction Refresher
  4. Video: 5.02 Spontaneous vs. Nonspontaneous
  5. Video: 5.10 Standard versus Nonstandard Free Energy Change
  6. Video: 5.03 The Second Law of Thermodynamics
  7. Video: 5.04 Entropy
  8. Video: 5.05 Entropy of the Universe
  9. Video: 5.06 Gibbs Free Energy
  10. Video: 5.06a Gibbs Free Energy Example Problem 1
  11. Video: 5.06b Gibbs Free Energy Example Problem 2
  12. Video: 5.07 The Third Law of Thermodynamics
  13. Video: 5.08 Calculating Standard Entropy Change
  14. Video: 5.08a Thermodynamics Worked Example
  15. Video: 5.09 Calculating Standard Free Energy Change
  16. Video: 5.09a Thermodynamics Worked Example
  17. Video: 5.09b Thermodynamics Worked Example
  18. Video: 5.11 Comparing ∆G° and K
  19. Video: 5.10a Thermodynamics Worked Example
  20. Video: 5.10b Thermodynamics Worked Example
  21. Video: 5.02a Spontaneous vs Nonspontaneous Example Problem

Graded: Thermodynamics
Graded: Advanced Chemistry Final Assessment

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