Making Sense of the News: News Literacy Lessons for Digital Citizens

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Making Sense of the News: News Literacy Lessons for Digital Citizens

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Opleiderscore: starstarstarstar_halfstar_border 7,2 Coursera (CC) heeft een gemiddelde beoordeling van 7,2 (uit 6 ervaringen)

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Beschrijving

When you enroll for courses through Coursera you get to choose for a paid plan or for a free plan

  • Free plan: No certicification and/or audit only. You will have access to all course materials except graded items.
  • Paid plan: Commit to earning a Certificate—it's a trusted, shareable way to showcase your new skills.

About this course: Never before has the need for News Literacy been more urgent. As news consumers are bombarded with a constant stream of fake news, propaganda, hoaxes, rumors, satire, and advertising — that often masquerade as credible journalism — it is becoming more and more difficult to distinguish fact from fiction. While the public’s faith in the news media erodes, purveyors of misinformation have helped give rise to troubling cultural trends and alarming political movements. This six-week course will help learners develop their critical thinking skills to enable them to better identify reliable information in news reports and to become better informed about the world in which we…

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When you enroll for courses through Coursera you get to choose for a paid plan or for a free plan

  • Free plan: No certicification and/or audit only. You will have access to all course materials except graded items.
  • Paid plan: Commit to earning a Certificate—it's a trusted, shareable way to showcase your new skills.

About this course: Never before has the need for News Literacy been more urgent. As news consumers are bombarded with a constant stream of fake news, propaganda, hoaxes, rumors, satire, and advertising — that often masquerade as credible journalism — it is becoming more and more difficult to distinguish fact from fiction. While the public’s faith in the news media erodes, purveyors of misinformation have helped give rise to troubling cultural trends and alarming political movements. This six-week course will help learners develop their critical thinking skills to enable them to better identify reliable information in news reports and to become better informed about the world in which we live. The course will discuss the key elements of journalism from the viewpoint of the news audience. The language of instruction is English, but Chinese and Spanish subtitles will be available. Each week will tackle a challenge unique to the digital era: Week 1: The power of information is now in the hands of consumers. Week 2: What makes journalism different from other types of information? Week 3: Where can we find trustworthy information? Week 4: How to tell what’s fair and what’s biased. Week 5: How to apply news literacy concepts in real life. Week 6: Meeting the challenges of digital citizenship.

Who is this class for: We are thrilled to make this course available for anybody who is interested in learning how to evaluate the quality of news and journalism in order to judge the reliability of information and make informed judgment. It is an online version of the News Literacy curriculum developed at Stony Brook University in New York and the University of Hong Kong. More than 15,000 university students in ten countries have taken it over the last ten years. We have been constantly updating our course material by incorporating the impact of the growing popularity of smart phones and social media services around the world. We hope you enjoy the course!

Created by:  The University of Hong Kong, The State University of New York
  • Taught by:  Masato Kajimoto, Assistant Professor

    Journalism and Media Studies Centre, The University of Hong Kong
  • Taught by:  Howard Schneider, Dean

    Stony Brook University School of Journalism
  • Taught by:  Anne Kruger, Lecturer

    Journalism and Media Studies Centre, The University of Hong Kong
  • Taught by:  Steven Reiner, Associate Professor

    Stony Brook University School of Journalism
  • Taught by:  Jonathan Anzalone, Lecturer and Assistant Director of the Center for News Literacy

    Stony Brook University School of Journalism
  • Taught by:  Michael A. Spikes, Director, Digital Resources

    Center for News Literacy, Stony Brook University School of Journalism
  • Taught by:  Richard Hornik, Lecturer

    Stony Brook University School of Journalism
Level Beginner Commitment 6 weeks of study, 2-3 hours/week Language English, Subtitles: Spanish, Polish, Chinese (Traditional), Chinese (Simplified) How To Pass Pass all graded assignments to complete the course. User Ratings 4.8 stars Average User Rating 4.8See what learners said Coursework

Each course is like an interactive textbook, featuring pre-recorded videos, quizzes and projects.

Help from your peers

Connect with thousands of other learners and debate ideas, discuss course material, and get help mastering concepts.

Certificates

Earn official recognition for your work, and share your success with friends, colleagues, and employers.

The University of Hong Kong The University of Hong Kong is the territory’s oldest institute of higher learning and also an internationally recognized, research led, comprehensive university. It engages in frontier research and academic endeavours that reflect and address the needs of a fast changing, knowledge-based world. The State University of New York The State University of New York, with 64 unique institutions, is the largest comprehensive system of higher education in the United States. Educating nearly 468,000 students in more than 7,500 degree and certificate programs both on campus and online, SUNY has nearly 3 million alumni around the globe.

Syllabus


WEEK 1


Making sense of the news is more important than ever



5 videos, 5 readings expand


  1. Video: Why news literacy matters
  2. Reading: Recommended resources: Why news literacy matters
  3. Video: Power of information
  4. Reading: Recommended resources: Power of information
  5. Video: Shoot the messenger: Why journalists become targets
  6. Reading: Recommended resources: Why journalists become targets
  7. Discussion Prompt: The dangers of journalism
  8. Video: Communication models and media
  9. Reading: Definitions: "Social media" and "News cycles"
  10. Video: News cycles in the age of social media
  11. Reading: Recommended resources: News cycles in the age of social media
  12. Discussion Prompt: We are all active participants

Graded: Power of Information
Graded: The responsibility of digital citizens

WEEK 2


What is news and who decides?



5 videos, 6 readings expand


  1. Video: What makes journalism different
  2. Reading: Recommended resources: What makes journalism different
  3. Video: Information Neighborhoods
  4. Reading: Recommended resources: Information neighborhoods
  5. Video: Blurred lines
  6. Reading: Recommended resources: Blurred lines
  7. Discussion Prompt: Native Advertising
  8. Video: Universal news drivers
  9. Reading: Recommended resources: What makes news
  10. Video: Editorial judgment
  11. Reading: Exercise: Editorial judgment
  12. Discussion Prompt: Editorial judgment
  13. Reading: Tell us more about yourself [optional survey]

Graded: What is news and who decides?
Graded: What makes some information newsworthy?

WEEK 3


Where can we find trustworthy information?



6 videos, 6 readings expand


  1. Video: Truth
  2. Reading: Recommended resources: Truth is provisional
  3. Video: Evidence
  4. Reading: Recommended resources: Evidence and fact checking
  5. Video: Why verification fails
  6. Reading: Recommended resources: Why verification fails
  7. Discussion Prompt: Following the story
  8. Video: What is media bias?
  9. Reading: Recommended resources: Understanding bias
  10. Video: Cognitive dissonance, confirmation bias
  11. Discussion Prompt: Am I biased?
  12. Reading: Recommended resources: Testing our own bias
  13. Video: Opinion journalism and bloviation
  14. Reading: Recommended resources: Opinion journalism

Graded: Truth in Journalism
Graded: Media bias, audience bias

WEEK 4


Says who?



4 videos, 4 readings expand


  1. Video: How do we find fairness?
  2. Reading: Recommended resources: False equivalence
  3. Discussion Prompt: Is the news story fair or falsely balanced?
  4. Video: The importance of sources
  5. Reading: Recommended resources: Sources
  6. Video: Evaluating sources: IM VAIN
  7. Reading: Recommended resources: What makes a source reliable
  8. Video: Evaluating anonymous sources
  9. Reading: Recommended resources: Anonymous sources
  10. Discussion Prompt: Finding the perfect source

Graded: Fairness and balance
Graded: Source evaluation

WEEK 5


How do I apply news literacy skills?



5 videos, 5 readings expand


  1. Video: News Deconstruction Steps
  2. Discussion Prompt: Deconstruction in action
  3. Video: Debunking the viral news
  4. Reading: Recommended resources: Debunking
  5. Reading: Recommended resources: Fake news
  6. Video: News best covered by print
  7. Reading: Recommended resources: Stories for print journalism
  8. Video: Stories that benefit from images, audio and video
  9. Reading: Recommended resources: Power of images
  10. Video: Power of new media
  11. Reading: Recommended resources: Online news
  12. Discussion Prompt: Are you sharing news?

Graded: Deconstructing News
Graded: Medium is the message

WEEK 6


Meeting the challenges of digital citizenship



3 videos, 2 readings expand


  1. Video: Numbers in context: Opinion polls and surveys
  2. Video: Numbers in context: Health science
  3. Reading: Recommended resources: Essential statistics guide for smart news audience
  4. Discussion Prompt: What is that number really telling us?
  5. Video: News angles
  6. Reading: How did you find the course? [optional survey]

Graded: Beyond the news literacy basics
Graded: News deconstruction

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