Design Thinking for Innovation

Type product
Logo van Coursera (CC)
Opleiderscore: starstarstarstar_halfstar_border 7,2 Coursera (CC) heeft een gemiddelde beoordeling van 7,2 (uit 6 ervaringen)

Tip: meer info over het programma, prijs, en inschrijven? Download de brochure!

Beschrijving

When you enroll for courses through Coursera you get to choose for a paid plan or for a free plan

  • Free plan: No certicification and/or audit only. You will have access to all course materials except graded items.
  • Paid plan: Commit to earning a Certificate—it's a trusted, shareable way to showcase your new skills.

About this course: Today innovation is everyone's business. Whether you are a manager in a global corporation, an entrepreneur starting up, in a government role, or a teacher in an elementary school, everyone is expected to get lean – to do better with less. And that is why we all need design thinking. At every level in every kind of organization, design thinking provides the tools you need to become an innovative thinker and uncover creative opportunities that are there – you're just not seeing them yet. In this course, we provide an overview of design thinking and work with a model containing four key questions and several tools to help you understand design thinking as a problem solv…

Lees de volledige beschrijving

Veelgestelde vragen

Er zijn nog geen veelgestelde vragen over dit product. Als je een vraag hebt, neem dan contact op met onze klantenservice.

Nog niet gevonden wat je zocht? Bekijk deze onderwerpen: Design Thinking, Innovatie, Lean, Lean Startup en Grafische Vormgeving.

When you enroll for courses through Coursera you get to choose for a paid plan or for a free plan

  • Free plan: No certicification and/or audit only. You will have access to all course materials except graded items.
  • Paid plan: Commit to earning a Certificate—it's a trusted, shareable way to showcase your new skills.

About this course: Today innovation is everyone's business. Whether you are a manager in a global corporation, an entrepreneur starting up, in a government role, or a teacher in an elementary school, everyone is expected to get lean – to do better with less. And that is why we all need design thinking. At every level in every kind of organization, design thinking provides the tools you need to become an innovative thinker and uncover creative opportunities that are there – you're just not seeing them yet. In this course, we provide an overview of design thinking and work with a model containing four key questions and several tools to help you understand design thinking as a problem solving approach. We also look at several stories from different organizations that used design thinking to uncover compelling solutions.

Created by:  University of Virginia
  • Taught by:  Jeanne M. Liedtka, United Technologies Corporation Professor of Business Administration

    Darden School of Business
Level Beginner Commitment 5 weeks of study, 1-2 hours/week Language English How To Pass Pass all graded assignments to complete the course. User Ratings 4.6 stars Average User Rating 4.6See what learners said Coursework

Each course is like an interactive textbook, featuring pre-recorded videos, quizzes and projects.

Help from your peers

Connect with thousands of other learners and debate ideas, discuss course material, and get help mastering concepts.

Certificates

Earn official recognition for your work, and share your success with friends, colleagues, and employers.

University of Virginia A premier institution of higher education, The University of Virginia offers outstanding academics, world-class faculty, and an inspiring, supportive environment. Founded by Thomas Jefferson in 1819, the University is guided by his vision of discovery, innovation, and development of the full potential of students from all walks of life. Through these courses, global learners have an opportunity to study with renowned scholars and thought leaders.

Syllabus


WEEK 1


What Is Design Thinking?



Welcome to the course -- we're excited you're here! We will begin by unpacking what we mean by design thinking and why it is more effective than traditional methods when the goal is innovation. By looking at the case history of The Good Kitchen, a Denmark program for providing meals for the elderly, we will explore how the mindset and practice of the innovation team that partnered with innovation consultant Hatch & Bloom enabled them to achieve innovation and growth. We’ll also examine what kinds of challenges are best-suited for design thinking and learn about the Visualization tool, which helps bring ideas to life. By the end of this module, you'll have a better understanding of what we mean by design thinking, when to use it, and how to use the Visualization tool.


7 videos, 2 readings expand


  1. Reading: Course Overview
  2. Reading: Learning Community
  3. Video: Introduction to Design Thinking
  4. Video: What Is Design Thinking? Hear from the Experts
  5. Video: The Good Kitchen Story
  6. Video: Business Model Innovation
  7. Video: Challenges Best-Suited for Design Thinking
  8. Video: Visualization Tool
  9. Video: Right Brain Thinking


WEEK 2


Preparing Your Mind for Innovation



Design thinking is not only about process and tools, it is about people as well: about you as a design thinker and about the people you want to create value for and with. And so, before we jump into the process of using design thinking to generate and test ideas, we want to first focus on your mindset, and look at whether your mind is prepared to both see and act on opportunity when it shows up in your world. We will examine this issue by looking at the stories of two very capable managers, George and Geoff, and how their differing mindsets affect their ability to lead innovation and growth. We'll also learn about the value of the Storytelling tool. By the end of this module, you'll have a better understanding of a mind prepared to see and take action when opportunity arises, and how to use the Storytelling tool.


4 videos expand


  1. Video: The Physics of Innovation
  2. Video: The Story of George & Geoff
  3. Video: How Prepared Is Your Mind?
  4. Video: Storytelling Tool


WEEK 3


Idea Generation



Now we will dive deeper into the design thinking process, looking at how we can use it to generate better ideas. In this module, we will look at the story of an entrepreneur, Chris Cartter, and his start-up, MeYouHealth, as they worked with Boston design firm, Essential Design, to understand the kind of opportunity that social networking might hold for helping us to improve our health. Examining what already exists is the first step in the design thinking process. As part of assessing "what is?", designers “follow the customer home” and explore the problems they are trying to solve in life versus their product use. Once they have thoroughly explored and looked for patterns, designers look toward the future and ask "what if?" This is the creative part of the process, but it also requires a disciplined approach. By the end of this module, you'll understand how to use design thinking to generate innovative ideas, how to apply the "what is?" and "what if?" questions, and how to use the Mind Mapping tool.


4 videos expand


  1. Video: The Idea Generation Process
  2. Video: The MeYouHealth Story Part I: What Is?
  3. Video: The MeYouHealth Story Part II: What If?
  4. Video: Mind Mapping Tool


WEEK 4


Experimentation



Having generated all of these innovative ideas, what’s next? The design thinking process now helps us to take the many ideas we have generated and figure out how to determine which ones are likely to produce the specific kinds of outcomes we want, whether these take the form of improved nutrition for the elderly (e.g., The Good Kitchen), healthier lifestyle choices (e.g., MeYouHealth) or even more “hot leads” emanating from your trade shows (as in the IBM example to follow). In this module, we will follow the activities of an IBM team working closely with experience marketing agency George P. Johnson as they develop and test ideas for a revolutionary approach to trade show participation. This process begins by asking "what wows?". This question brings together the customer and business cases supporting our new concepts. Typically, the “wow” zone occurs at the intersection of three criteria: 1) somebody wants it, 2) we can create and deliver it, and 3) doing so has the potential to produce the outcomes we want. Then we ask "what works?" and conduct small experiments to test if our assumptions are accurate. By the end of this module, you'll understand how to apply the "what wows?" and "what works?" questions, and how to use the Learning Launch tool. We'll conclude by reviewing our lessons and discussing strategic opportunities.


5 videos expand


  1. Video: What Wows & What Works?
  2. Video: The IBM Story
  3. Video: Learning Launch Tool
  4. Video: Reviewing Our Lessons
  5. Video: Strategic Opportunities


WEEK 5


Final Assignment



This module hosts materials related to your final assignment for the course. The assignment requires selecting one of the design thinking tools presented in the course, writing a reflection, and completing three peer reviews. To successfully complete the course, you must complete and pass the final assignment.


1 reading, 1 practice quiz expand


  1. Reading: Final Assignment Overview
  2. Practice Quiz: Peer Review Practice

Graded: Reflection

Blijf op de hoogte van nieuwe ervaringen

Er zijn nog geen ervaringen.

Deel je ervaring

Heb je ervaring met deze cursus? Deel je ervaring en help anderen kiezen. Als dank voor de moeite doneert Springest € 1,- aan Stichting Edukans.

Er zijn nog geen veelgestelde vragen over dit product. Als je een vraag hebt, neem dan contact op met onze klantenservice.

Download gratis en vrijblijvend de informatiebrochure

Aanhef
(optioneel)
(optioneel)
(optioneel)
(optioneel)
(optioneel)

Heb je nog vragen?

(optioneel)
We slaan je gegevens op om je via e-mail en evt. telefoon verder te helpen.
Meer info vind je in ons privacybeleid.